Treasurers of All-Volunteer Organizations: Eight Key Responsibilities

More than half of the nonprofits in the United States are estimated to be all-volunteer organizations. Here is a wonderful, succinct guide for the 600,000 + treasurers of such organizations:

My time as treasurer of a faith-based nonprofit was a labor of love. Starting out as an all-volunteer organization with a $20,000 budget, we developed financial systems, workable budgets, and demonstrated accountability. We served families affected by incarceration and there's no greater personal reward than seeing people realize they have real hope for a better life. In just three years the budget grew to over $330,000.

However, there was stress as well. As a CPA I found myself the recipient of unnerving deference at times. I frequently fell short in communicating financial information to board and staff. But the outcomes made it all worthwhile.

This experience helps me appreciate one of the many unsung heroes of our time: the treasurer of the all-volunteer organization (AVO). AVOs are among the most important and most invisible building blocks of our communities. Members of all-volunteer organizations read to children, care for the dying, get clean water legislation passed, serve as . . .

Outdated Job Description May be Getting Us in Trouble

Dear Rita: Help! I'm the executive director of a nonprofit with 35 employees. Recently, one of our employees said he can't drive anymore due to vision problems. It's his job to drive to different client sites to provide training . . . we serve a rural community without much public transit. I looked at his job description -- which is outdated -- and it says nothing about driving! I can't believe it isn't listed there, but it's clearly part of his job and necessary to reach our clients. I know the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) says that employees must be able to do the essential functions of the job, but we never put driving into his job description. Now what do we do? Signed, Wish I Had a Time Machine

Dear Wish I Had a Time Machine: This sounds like a frustrating learning opportunity. Like you, many employers would often do things differently if they could go back in time, since managing employee disabilities is a huge area of risk, yet rarely clear-cut.

First let's talk about what you can do so that in the future you won't have a thorny situation in front of us as you do now. Then we'll talk about what to do given the old job description in place . . .

Who's the Boss? The Board or the Executive?

There is an abundance of advice for nonprofit boards and EDs that speaks to the advantages of "partnership" and "open communications." But sometimes that advice just doesn't feel like enough.

Who's the boss? The board or the executive director/CEO?

The answer: it depends on whether the board is acting as a body, or whether board members are acting as individuals. The key is remembering that the board is different from board members.

It's not the board president who hires the executive director; only the board as a whole can do that. The treasurer doesn't approve the budget; the board as a whole does that. In other words, when the board is acting as a body, it is the boss. The executive is answerable to that body.

On the other hand, when board member act as individuals, they . . .

A Nonprofit Dashboard and Signal Light for Boards

(If you have trouble seeing the graphics in this article, you can download a PDF free here.)

The dashboard in a car gives an instant update on many important factors: speed, gas left in the tank, engine temperature, whether the air conditioner is on. If your dashboard isn't working, it's unnerving and upsetting. But at the same time, when it IS working, you glance at it from time to time but you don't look at it constantly.

A nonprofit dashboard is similar: it gives important information to decision makers such as executives and boards in a quick-read way. But a dashboard has limitations: it doesn't tell you if you're taking the right road to Chicago, or more importantly, whether you should be going to Chicago at all!

The idea of making data -- especially financial data -- easily readable for board members is not a new one. Building on that basic idea, we've added two critical features:

Can We Discriminate in Favor of People with Disabilities?

Dear Rita: Our agency serves clients with mental health needs, and we like to provide employment opportunities to individuals with mental illness. Can we create the position of peer counselor and in the job advertisement say that the applicant should have a mental illness? We are doing this not only to provide employment opportunities to individuals with mental illness, but also so our clients can better relate to our counselors and the counselors will better understand the challenges facing their clients. Is it lawful to give preference in hiring to applicants with disabilities? Signed, Confused

Dear Confused:

The short answer is yes, if you're careful. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) only protects . . .